Cholesterol Levels

What is a cholesterol test?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that's found in your blood and every cell of your body. You need some cholesterol to keep your cells and organs healthy. Your liver makes all the cholesterol your body needs. But you can also get cholesterol from the foods you eat, especially meat, eggs, poultry, and dairy products. Foods that are high in dietary fat can also make your liver produce more cholesterol.

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There are two main types of cholesterol: low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol. A cholesterol test is a blood test that measures the amount of each type of cholesterol and certain fats in your blood.

Too much LDL cholesterol in your blood may put you at risk for heart disease and other serious conditions. High LDL levels can cause the build-up of plaque, a fatty substance that narrows the arteries and blocks blood from flowing normally. When blood flow to the heart is blocked, it can cause a heart attack. When blood flow to the brain is blocked, it can lead to stroke and peripheral artery disease.

Other names for a cholesterol test: Lipid profile, Lipid panel

What is it used for?

If you have high cholesterol, you may not experience any symptoms at all, but you could be at significant risk for heart disease. A cholesterol test can give your health care provider important information about the cholesterol levels in your blood. The test measures:

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    LDL levels: Also known as the "bad" cholesterol, LDL is the main source of blockages in the arteries.

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    HDL levels: Considered the "good" cholesterol, HDL helps get rid of "bad" LDL cholesterol.

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    Total cholesterol: The combined amount of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in your blood.

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    Triglycerides: A type of fat found in your blood. According to some studies, high levels of triglycerides may increase the risk of heart disease, especially in women.

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    VLDL levels: Very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) is another type of "bad" cholesterol. Development of plaque on the arteries has been linked to high VLDL levels. It's not easy to measure VLDL, so most of the time these levels are estimated based on triglyceride measurements.

Why do I need a cholesterol test?

Your doctor may order a cholesterol test as part of a routine exam, or if you have a family history of heart disease or one or more of the following risk factors:

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    High blood pressure

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    Type 2 diabetes

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    Smoking

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    Excess weight or obesity

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    Lack of physical activity

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    A diet high in saturated fat

Your age may also be a factor, because your risk for heart disease increases as you get older.

What happens during a cholesterol test?

A health care professional will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm, using a small needle. After the needle is inserted, a small amount of blood will be collected into a test tube or vial. You may feel a little sting when the needle goes in or out. This usually takes less than five minutes.
 
Cholesterol tests are usually done in the morning, as you may be asked to refrain from eating for several hours prior to the test.

Will I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

You may need to fast--no food or drink--for 9 to 12 hours before your blood is drawn. Your health care provider will let you know if you need to fast and if there are any special instructions to follow.

What do the results mean?

Cholesterol is usually measured in milligrams (mg) of cholesterol per deciliter (dL) of blood. The information below shows how the different types of cholesterol measurements are categorized.

Desirable Less than 200mg/dL
Borderline high 200-239 mg/dL
High 240mg/dL and above
Optimal Less than 100mg/dL
Near optimal/above optimal 100-129mg/dL
Borderline high 130-159 mg/dL
High 160-189 mg/dL
Very High 190 mg/dL and above
Considered protective against heart disease 60 mg/dL and higher
The higher, the better 40-59 mg/dL
A major risk factor for heart disease Less than 40 mg/dL

A healthy cholesterol range for you may depend on your age, family history, lifestyle, and other risk factors. In general, low LDL levels and high HDL cholesterol levels are good for heart health. High levels of triglycerides may also put you at risk for heart disease.

The LDL on your results may say "calculated" which means it includes a calculation of total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides. Your LDL level may also be measured "directly," without using other measurements. Regardless, you want your LDL number to be low.

Is there anything else I need to know about my cholesterol levels?

High cholesterol can lead to heart disease, the number one cause of death in the United States. While some risk factors for cholesterol, such as age and heredity, are beyond your control, there are actions you can take to lower your LDL levels and reduce your risk, including:

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    Eating a healthy diet: Reducing or avoiding foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol can help reduce the cholesterol levels in your blood.

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    Losing weight: Being overweight can increase your cholesterol and risk for heart disease.

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    Staying active: Regular exercise may help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol levels and raise your HDL (good) cholesterol levels. It may also help you lose weight.

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Talk to your health care provider before making any major change in your diet or exercise routine.

References

References

1. American Heart Association [Internet]. Dallas (TX): American Heart Association Inc.; c2017. About Cholesterol; [updated 2016 Aug 10; cited 2017 Feb 6]; [about 3screens]. Available

2. American Heart Association [Internet]. Dallas (TX): American Heart Association Inc.; c2017. Good vs. Bad Cholesterol; [updated 2017 Jan 10; cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 3 screens]. Available

3. American Heart Association [Internet]. Dallas (TX): American Heart Association Inc.; c2017. How To Get Your Cholesterol Tested; [updated 2016 Mar 28; cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 3screens]. Available

4. American Heart Association [Internet]. Dallas (TX): American Heart Association Inc.; c2017. Prevention and Treatment of High Cholesterol; [updated 2016 Aug 30; cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 7 screens]. Available

5. American Heart Association [Internet]. Dallas (TX): American Heart Association Inc.; c2017. What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean; [updated 2016 Aug 17; cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 3 screens]. Available

6. Healthfinder.gov. [Internet]. Washington D.C.: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; National Health Information Center; Get Your Cholesterol Checked; [updated 2017 Jan 4; cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 4 screens]. Available 

7. Mayo Clinic [Internet]. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; c1998-2017.Cholesterol Test: Overview; 2016 Jan 12 [cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 3 screens]. Available

8. Mayo Clinic [Internet]. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; c1998-2017.Cholesterol Test: What you can expect; 2016 Jan 12 [cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 6 screens]. Available

9. Mayo Clinic [Internet]. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; c1998-2017. Cholesterol Test: Why it's done; 2016 Jan 12 [cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 4 screens]. Available

10. Mayo Clinic [Internet]. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; c1998-2017.High Cholesterol: Overview 2016 Feb 9 [cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 3 screens]. Available

11. Mayo Clinic [Internet]. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; c1998-2017.VLDL cholesterol: Is it harmful? [cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 3 screens]. Available

12. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; High Blood Cholesterol: What You Need to Know; 2001 May [updated 2005 Jun; cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 5 screens]. Available

13. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; How is High Blood Cholesterol Diagnosed? 2001 May [updated 2016 Apr 8; cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 5 screens]. Available

14. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; What Are the Risks of Blood Tests? [updated 2012 Jan 6; cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 5 screens. Available

15. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; What is Cholesterol? [cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 4 screens]. Available 

16. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; What To Expect with Blood Tests; [updated 2012 Jan 6; cited 2017 Jan 25]; [about 5 screens]. Available

17.Quest Diagnostics [Internet].Quest Diagnostics; c2000-2017. Test Center: LDL Cholesterol; [updated 2012 Dec; cited 2017 Jan 26]; [about 3 screens]. Available

The medical information provided is for informational purposes only and is not to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please contact your health care provider with questions you may have regarding medical conditions or the interpretation of test results.